GUIDE ON EMIGRATING TO IRELAND

Ireland VISAs

All immigrants arriving from the European Union are free to enter Ireland without the need for a VISA. As an immigrant from the UK you are exempt from immigration controls at the port of entry, but you cannot stay for longer than a month without obtaining permission the relevant authorities. The Irish Republic and Great Britain are part of a ‘Common Travel Area’, which means that foreigners travelling to Ireland via the UK must meet British immigration requirements and will then be free to enter Ireland. If you’re a British citizen arriving in Ireland from Britain, you don’t require a passport, although it’s advisable to take some form of identity with you.

Working in Ireland

As a UK citizen you fall under the category of EU national and are therefore able to come and go to Ireland as often as you like without the need for a VISA. This also applies if you go to the country looking for work. A work permit is not required to make an investment, buy a property or even to start a new company in the country. Non EU citizens however will be required to hold a work permit if they wish to find work. There are exceptions such as if you have an Irish spouse or Irish parents, been posted to Ireland for more than four years or have been granted refugee status.

Residency permits

As a citizen of the EU you can apply for a residency permit if you can prove that you can support yourself without the need of state assistance. You shouldn’t have any problems if you fall under the following category.

  1. Employed or self-employed.
  2. A retiree or otherwise ‘economically non-active.
  3. A student.
  4. Receiving or providing a service in Ireland.

If for any reason you are denied a residency permit you will be notified of the reasons why and will have the chance to appeal against the decision. For people seeking a long-term residency permit you will need  have been legally resident in Ireland for more than five years to apply for a residence stamp, which allows them to remain for a further five years. Those who have been legally resident for more than ten years can obtain a stamp entitling them to permission to reside indefinitely in Ireland.